1. Popular on Amazon: Wildly misleading self-published books about Ebola, by random people without medical degrees →

    Welcome to the unscrupulous, conspiracy-filled Wild West of Ebola self-publishing, where an epidemic is less a grave social problem — and more an opportunity to cash in on people’s fears.

    Tumblarians, be very wary of these titles, and warn your patrons too.

  2. What has Amazon beat on all-you-can-read e-books? Your public library →

    willywaldo:

    Though you still have to deal with due dates, hold lists and occasionally clumsy software, libraries, at least for now, have one killer feature that the others don’t: e-books you actually want to read

  3. He placed his long-fingered hand on Jeff’s chest. Jeff heard himself whimper quietly from somewhere beyond his control. “And what about content, Jeff? I assume there are restrictions? You have to take the fun out of it somehow.”

    “Well we’re not allowing crossover, where characters from two fictional worlds interact.” Jeff could barely get the words out now. He had never felt this strange intensity, this lust for anyone. He felt a strange throb where his soul had once been, years ago.

    — 

    Amazon to monetize fan fiction, he moaned | MobyLives

    Dustin wrote Jeff Bezos fan fiction and it is beautiful.

  4. I have seen… Amazon creep into library lending with Kindle ebook availability. The convenience of getting the format balanced by the understanding that Amazon knows your library history - at least your digital one. The courtesy reminders that your ebook is coming due accompanied by the ability to “buy it to continue reading.” Above all, Amazon is a business, and they do it quite successfully, if not without questions and concerns. I fully expect to see this same creep into Goodreads. One of these days one of the Amazon emails will state: “You listed X in your Goodreads profile; would you like to read Y?” That may be my tipping point. Until then, I am using the Goodreads export feature to update my LibraryThing account. So, come find me in both places, for now. Is all of this affecting how you are handling your Goodreads, LibraryThing or other online book account?

    — Books, Yarn, Ink and Other Pursuits: Amazon, Goodreads, LibraryThing

  5. Amazon buys Goodreads — and then goes totally hip | Washington Post

    I don’t know if words can adequately express how much I love and admire Ron Charles, one of my all-time book review heroes.

  6. From that perspective, moving away from Amazon may have been the best way to ensure a buyout by Amazon.

    — From A Goodreads Spoiled: All Your Books are Belong to Amazon. (via patrondebris)

  7. One other distinction that seems to have cropped up as these cultures collide is where authors and publishers fit in. Goodreads tolerates a lot of marketing and is much more attractive to publishers, authors, and…well, Amazon.

    LibraryThing has a welcome mat for authors and publishers, but there are distinct social boundaries that the community has set beyond which marketing and promotion is unwelcome. The terms of service states clearly, “Do not use LibraryThing as an advertising medium. Egregious commercial solicitation is forbidden. No matter how great your novel, this does apply to authors.”

    — Librarian Barbara Fister holding forth on the differences between Goodreads and LibraryThing. If you’re entertaining jumping ship in the wake of the news about Amazon buying Goodreads, I recommend digesting her fine articulation. (via cloudunbound)

  8. Neither of them is very confident, however, about Goodreads’ future. “I’m a very faithful user!” Mickelsen explained, but “I don’t trust Amazon’s business practices.” Shea worries that it will be “difficult to discern what recommendations come from [Goodreads’] algorithm and what have been paid for.” Leah White, reader services librarian from Northbrook P.L. in Illinois said, “I worry about the consolidation of reading resources on the internet—Amazon now owns Shelfari, Audible, and Goodreads” as well being the biggest retailer of books on the internet. “This lack of diversity scares me.”

    — Will Librarians Still Use Goodreads? by your LJ tumblrer, in which collection development and readers’ advisory mavens Erin Shea, Leah White, Anna Mickelsen, and Robin Bradford discuss Amazon’s recent purchase.

  9. cloudunbound:

In the event that you don’t think that Amazon is in the habit of acquiring businesses, a chart dating to 2009 via Ebook Friendly. As EF points out, for a full history, sans the Goodreads buy, go here.
I haven’t heard of at least 70 percent of these companies.

    cloudunbound:

    In the event that you don’t think that Amazon is in the habit of acquiring businesses, a chart dating to 2009 via Ebook Friendly. As EF points out, for a full history, sans the Goodreads buy, go here.

    I haven’t heard of at least 70 percent of these companies.

  10. The move also adds to the sense that Amazon is slowly buying up much of the book world. Over some 15 years, the company has bought AbeBooks.com, Audible.com, Brilliance Audio, the Book Depository, Shelfari, BookFinder.com, Lexcycle, BookSurge, CreateSpace, Mobipocket.com and (through AbeBooks) 40% of Library Thing.

    — 

    Amazon Buying Goodreads: Industry Reactions - Shelf Awareness

    Pretty impressive list of ownership by Amazon. And by impressive, I mean “thoughtfully frightening sometimes”.

    (via booksyarnink)

  11. Goodreads is joining the Amazon family →

    booksyarnink:

    Holy crap.

    HOLY CRAP IS RIGHT

  12. Amazon Publishing launches literary fiction imprint, Little A →

    cloudunbound:

    More below from Laura Hazard Owen on the content:

    "Upcoming titles from Little A will include James Franco’s novel Actors Anonymous — which Larry Kirshbaum signed back in 2011, and which will be published this October — among others. A digital-only series called Day One will focus on ‘short stories from debut writers’; those will be sold in the Kindle Singles store.”

    Unsurprised on the inclusion of one J. Francs.

  13. My first impressions: a) I’m awfully suspicious that it means nothing good for writers who want to get paid for their work using the current compensation model, b) If Amazon actually wants this to work they are going to have to become strikingly transparent in their processes… c) if I were a lawyer I would already be salivating at the class-actions suits to be filed the very first time it becomes clear that Amazon is reselling eBooks that are not, in fact, the sole versions of that specific, originally sold copy…

    — 

    Writer John Scalzi in response to last week’s news that, per GeekWire’s Todd Bishop, “Amazon has been awarded what appears to be a broad patent on a ‘secondary market for digital objects’—a system for users to sell, trade and loan digital objects including audio files, eBooks, movies, apps, and pretty much anything else.”

    This is a hugely important development for librarians to track. I confess I’m confused how ownership versus licensing comes into play in a patent. Can Amazon resell ebooks if they don’t actually own them? Would the publisher have to grant that right in cases where Amazon is not the publisher?

    Russell Blake’s comment from Scalzi’s post:

    Amazon sells a license, not an actual ebook, so there can’t be a used ebook. If and when they change their Ts and Cs to reflect that self-publishers are agreeing to allow them to sell the actual ebook versus the license, then we’d all have to worry. But my hunch is that isn’t going to happen – self-pubbing at Amazon would basically dry up, and the trad pubs would never go along with it, so they’d be putting a bullet in their own, well-developed market. I personally don’t see that happening.

    *Cut to Heather’s brain exploding*

    (via cloudunbound)

  14. Sixty-one percent of book purchases by frequent book buyers take place online, but only seven percent of those buyers said they discovered that book online, while physical book stores account for 39 percent of units sold and 20 percent of discovery share.

    — 

    Laura Hazard Owen’s analysis of a new survey from the Codex Group tracking book discovery, presented last week at Digital Book World. The big concern is what happens when those bricks-and-mortar shops dwindle. Of course, libraries have always been a place of (mostly uncredited and undocumented) discovery, but OPAC integration (enabled by 3M via collaborations with Polaris and Bibliocommons) could change that. So could a simple change of attitude on the behalf of librarians, publishers, journalists, and consumers.

    I love what Stephanie Chase of the Seattle Public Library said on Twitter: 

    (via cloudunbound)

  15. chicagopubliclibrary:

BiblioTech - San Antonio’s Completely Bookless Public Library
From Gizmodo:


The new book-free library, called “BiblioTech,” is intended to open in the fall and is part of a an entire bookless public library system planned for the entire county of Bexar.
And it’s not “bring your own device” either. The library will actually lend out e-readers (of an unspecified brand) for two weeks at a time. There will also be computers and the like, but no books, and presumably no card catalog either.


Click here to read the full story. 

    chicagopubliclibrary:

    BiblioTech - San Antonio’s Completely Bookless Public Library

    From Gizmodo:

    The new book-free library, called “BiblioTech,” is intended to open in the fall and is part of a an entire bookless public library system planned for the entire county of Bexar.

    And it’s not “bring your own device” either. The library will actually lend out e-readers (of an unspecified brand) for two weeks at a time. There will also be computers and the like, but no books, and presumably no card catalog either.

    Click here to read the full story.