1. Achebe was acutely aware of “the danger of not having your own stories.” His 2000 collection of personal essays, Home and Exile, undertook the “process of ‘re-storying’ peoples who had been knocked silent by the trauma of all kinds of dispossession.” Library Journal said, “His passion and truth are sensuous and contagious, warming [the] soul.” In Achebe’s last novel, Anthills of the Savannah, an old man from Abazon speaks persuasively of the power of storytelling, which endures beyond wars and warriors. Carrying with it the wisdom of the past, “the story is our escort; without it, we are blind.”

    — “The story is our escort”: Chinua Achebe, 1930-2013, by yours truly, over at LJ Reviews.

Notes

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