1. Audrey Barbakoff, Ferry Godmother | LJ Movers & Shakers

When Barbakoff came to work at Bainbridge in October 2011, she noticed a gap in usage between youths and 50-plus retirees. She targeted working adults, especially the “elusive twenty- and thirtysomethings, and people who don’t have a lot of money.”
She added eight events a month to the library schedule, including a DIY series dubbed Radical Home Economics. Program attendance jumped dramatically, doubling to 600 adults in October 2012 from October 2011, Barbakoff says. Once she has perfected a program, she exports it to other Kitsap branches.
Barbakoff’s flagship may be Ferry Tales, a floating book group on the Bainbridge Island–Seattle commuter ferry. Up to 30 percent of Bainbridge’s adults take a ferry off-island to work, making it difficult for them to visit the library. After receiving state permission, Barbakoff started a monthly book group in March 2012 and an ask-a-librarian session. Ferry Tales now has 15 regular participants. “[The program] really made me get outside the library and approach people,” Barbakoff says. “It’s stretched me in dealing with a lot of different outside groups.”

Fun fact: Audrey is one of my travel reviewers and she is great.

    Audrey Barbakoff, Ferry Godmother | LJ Movers & Shakers

    When Barbakoff came to work at Bainbridge in October 2011, she noticed a gap in usage between youths and 50-plus retirees. She targeted working adults, especially the “elusive twenty- and thirtysomethings, and people who don’t have a lot of money.”

    She added eight events a month to the library schedule, including a DIY series dubbed Radical Home Economics. Program attendance jumped dramatically, doubling to 600 adults in October 2012 from October 2011, Barbakoff says. Once she has perfected a program, she exports it to other Kitsap branches.

    Barbakoff’s flagship may be Ferry Tales, a floating book group on the Bainbridge Island–Seattle commuter ferry. Up to 30 percent of Bainbridge’s adults take a ferry off-island to work, making it difficult for them to visit the library. After receiving state permission, Barbakoff started a monthly book group in March 2012 and an ask-a-librarian session. Ferry Tales now has 15 regular participants. “[The program] really made me get outside the library and approach people,” Barbakoff says. “It’s stretched me in dealing with a lot of different outside groups.”

    Fun fact: Audrey is one of my travel reviewers and she is great.

Notes

  1. rowanlane reblogged this from libraryjournal
  2. manythingsvaried reblogged this from libraryjournal and added:
    This program sounds awesome.
  3. cumaeansibyl reblogged this from pearwaldorf and added:
    Oh my god I want to take courses in Radical Home Economics … or TEACH them! I totally could! Sort of! I mean, idk if...
  4. pearwaldorf reblogged this from libraryjournal and added:
    I went to school with Audrey! She’s awesome!
  5. libraryjournal posted this