1. Your Friday funny! Have a great weekend.

    Your Friday funny! Have a great weekend.

    (Source: dogsmakeeverythingbetter.com)

  2. Total Boox to Offer Free Ebook Access During National Library Week →

    The Israel-based company is encouraging libraries to take advantage of the promotion to introduce patrons to ebook titles and to explore the service for themselves. Although the platform was developed for the consumer market, in recent months, Total Boox has begun cultivating partnerships with libraries.

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  3. jenunexpected:

    Some days, you catalog 16th century Bibles. Some days, you catalog 1980s vintage librarian porn. 

    (I know it’s tumblr and the black bars aren’t really necessary, but I like to keep my tumblr, at least, slightly SFW. Your work, anyway. The uncensored versions of this are all over my desk at the moment.) 

  4. LibraryReads - Books Recommended by Librarians →

    The May List is up! My editor’s spring pick The Bees made the cut! Yeah!

  5. 11 April 2014

    74 notes

    Reblogged from
    wnyc

    wnyc:

A Few Things We Learned from Rusty Foster about Heartbleed.
Change your passwords! There are some people who think that you should wait a few days, since there may still be people accessing your information, but Foster thinks it’s a good idea to change the important ones right away.
Consult this Mashable guide, which is keeping track of which passwords you should prioritize.
Never use the same password for different important accounts! And try to make your passwords complex. 
Here are three “password safe” programs that will help you come up with and remember hard-to-crack passwords: 1Password | LastPass | KeePass

    wnyc:

    A Few Things We Learned from Rusty Foster about Heartbleed.

    • Change your passwords! There are some people who think that you should wait a few days, since there may still be people accessing your information, but Foster thinks it’s a good idea to change the important ones right away.
    • Consult this Mashable guide, which is keeping track of which passwords you should prioritize.
    • Never use the same password for different important accounts! And try to make your passwords complex. 
    • Here are three “password safe” programs that will help you come up with and remember hard-to-crack passwords: 1Password LastPass KeePass

  6. I can still remember the day I unearthed The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4 from the shelves of my local library. I, too, was a teenager and had never encountered a book like it before. A quick scan through the pages revealed its easy layout and as a voracious reader, albeit a lazy one, the format of the book appealed. Within the covers of that book, I found pure pleasure. I have read and re-read that book and all the other Adrian Mole diaries many times throughout my life, even knowing chunks of text by heart, but I never tire of it. Sue Townsend;s characters are superbly drawn with idiosyncrasies and nuances that are second to none. Narratively, the most unusual things happen to Adrian but somehow Townsend makes his life entirely believable.

    — 

    Thank you Sue Townsend, for giving us Adrian Mole

    A lovely appreciation of the acclaimed author who died Thursday night at the age of 68.

  7. Shoes of Note Flat | Mod Retro Vintage Flats | ModCloth.com →

    The great shoe debate continues. For those of Tumblarians who want a pair of these fine Mary Janes, they are sold exclusively at ModCloth.

  8. Hot topic on the Fiction List_L list serv. I love how practical footwear advice turns into suggestions for book displays!

    Subject: Comfortable Shoes for Working in Library

     Hi Everyone,

     I work in the Library and am getting ready to buy me some new shoes. I am in need of shoes that are comfortable and that I can stand in for long periods of time. Do you all have any recommendations? Any help would be appreciated.

    Naots with removable footbeds which can be customized to your foot (you wear them for a couple of weeks, take them back to the store, which inspects the wear pattern and adjusts accordingly, e.g. more arch support). They also come in attractive styles.

    Steel toed Jimmy Choos. [See top photo—Ed.]

    I haven’t seen mentioned Mephisto yet!  They make comfortable footwear.

    Easy Spirit has some nice looking shoes that are pretty comfy..esp their Anti Gravity collection.Clarks is a good name too.

     I thought someone else would have mentioned them, but since no one has…Keen Shoes are my comfort brand of choice right now. And all this talk of shoes made me think of a display possibility. How about books with shoes on the cover? I know I see them all the time. Titles I can think of:

    The Devil Wears Prada (and sequel Chasing Harry Winston) Mud Season (which is what it is in Wisconsin right now) Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress.  What else?

    Belong to Me by Marisa de los Santos

    The Leftovers by Tom Perrotta

    The Giant’s House / Elizabeth McCracken

    (Source: )

  9. Library Care Packages: CDs, Freshly Picked | Music Matters →

    A lot of things justify maintaining and promoting physical music collections. One of my favorites is a service we’ve developed at the Cincinnati public library. The CD of the Month Club builds on the premise of music discovery services such as Pandora and was, in no small part, inspired by LJ 2012 Movers & Shakers Matthew Moyer and Andrew Coulon’s stellar Personalized Playlists program at the Jacksonville Public Library (ow.ly/uk8Ad). New club members fill out a form (either on paper or online at ow.ly/uk8qm) and answer a few questions about the kinds of music they typically enjoy. Each month, they’ll receive a mystery CD, chosen specifically for them by a team of music-loving library staff and shipped to their favorite branch. Before sending the selections we place a slip in the front of the jewel case, sometimes with a personal note. When the discs are ready to be picked up, patrons are notified just as with other holds.

    If your CD collection is gathering dust, here’s a brilliant idea to get them spinning again!

    (Source: addtoany.com)

  10. queenslibrary:

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald was first published today in 1925! It received mixed reviews and sold poorly; in its first year, the book sold only 20,000 copies. Fitzgerald died in 1940, believing himself to be a failure and his work forgotten. Today it is considered the supreme achievement of his career and an exemplary novel of the Jazz Age, acclaimed by generations of readers.

    queenslibrary:

    The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald was first published today in 1925! It received mixed reviews and sold poorly; in its first year, the book sold only 20,000 copies. Fitzgerald died in 1940, believing himself to be a failure and his work forgotten. Today it is considered the supreme achievement of his career and an exemplary novel of the Jazz Age, acclaimed by generations of readers.

  11. When a library is open, no matter its size or shape, democracy is open, too.

    — Bill Moyers in the foreword to this beautiful photographic love letter to libraries (via explore-blog)

  12. The New Age: Leaving Behind Everything, Or Nothing At All →

    Don’t toss out your old VCRs or Macs just yet.

    Among those grappling with this challenge are archivists at the . The organization at the University of Maryland advises universities on how to handle archives and keeps a large collection of antiquated technology — from floppy disk drives to film reels and to VCRs.

    The archivists of today need to stock those machines in order to read, copy and generally access all sorts of historical records. MITH Associate Director Trevor Muñoz says that means researchers often troll eBay for long-forgotten electronic equipment to make things work.

  13. 9 April 2014

    144 notes

    Reblogged from
    npr

    We are an NPR librarian and a digital preservationist who love saving old tech – ask us anything! : IAmA →

    gloriousclio:

    missrumphiusproject:

    nprmusic:

    npr:

    Janel Kinlaw, a librarian at NPR, and Trevor Muñoz, an associate director at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities will be answering your questions about preserving old technology at 3 p.m. ET on Reddit.

    Ask them anything. 

    Archivists are my heroes. —Lars

    I’ll be working but signal boost!

    This makes me wonder how future users will think about these items as they relate to Instagram, an app which may not exist even a decade from now. How do I represent what Instagram is/was in an archival collection? The photos will speak for themselves in many respects, but the user experience will not be the same.”

    YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

  14. vintageanchorbooks:

Debut novelists Eimear McBride, Audrey Magee and Hannah Kent join Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Donna Tartt and Jhumpa Lahiri on the shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction.
Announcing the list this evening (7th April) at the Serpentine Sackler gallery in central London, chair of judges Helen Fraser said each of this year’s shortlisted books was “original and extraordinary in its own way” and offered “something different and exciting and illuminating”.
More here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/tartt-lahiri-adichie-baileys-womens-shortlist.html

By the way, Adichie’s Americanah is on the fiction shortlist for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medal.
Good luck to all the nominees.

    vintageanchorbooks:

    Debut novelists Eimear McBride, Audrey Magee and Hannah Kent join Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Donna Tartt and Jhumpa Lahiri on the shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction.

    Announcing the list this evening (7th April) at the Serpentine Sackler gallery in central London, chair of judges Helen Fraser said each of this year’s shortlisted books was “original and extraordinary in its own way” and offered “something different and exciting and illuminating”.

    More here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/tartt-lahiri-adichie-baileys-womens-shortlist.html

    By the way, Adichie’s Americanah is on the fiction shortlist for ALA’s Andrew Carnegie Medal.

    Good luck to all the nominees.

  15. If you have a Twitter account or a blog, I’d like to challenge you to join me in blogging or tweeting about your local library system every day of National Library Week April 13-19. Highlight some aspect of your local library that you enjoy or think other people ought to know about. If you maintain both a general blog and a library blog, I’d like to suggest that your #nlw14 posts go on your general blog so we’re not all talking to each other during NLW. But any blog or social media feed will do. Let’s demonstrate the advocacy and promotion we’d like to see people do.

    — National Library Week: Lend Me Your Blogs and Twitter Feeds! | Librarian From Alaska (via librarianbyday)