1. As a group, Millennials are as likely as older adults to have used a library in the past 12 months, and more likely to have used a library website. Among those ages 16-29, 50% reported having used a library or bookmobile in the course of the past year in a September 2013 survey. Some 47% of those 30 and older had done so. Some 36% of younger Americans used a library website in that time frame, compared with 28% of those 30 and older. Despite their relatively high use of libraries, younger Americans are among the least likely to say that libraries are important.

    — Major new Pew study looks at millennials’ reading habits. This particular finding is striking — all the more reason to partake in the Knight Foundation’s 2014 NewsChallenge, which seeks breakthrough ideas to “leverage libraries as a platform to build more knowledgeable communities.” Because, lest we forget, “when a library is open, no matter its size or shape, democracy is open, too.” (via explore-blog)

  2. Looking forward to reading this library noir!

    Looking forward to reading this library noir!

    (Source: pinterest.com)

  3. One Book, Well Done →

  4. “Loading” Symbols Take Over Internet In Net Neutrality Protest →

    If the Internet seems a little slower than usual today, it’s probably not. But it may look that way due to a protest from Net Neutrality advocates around the web. Sites like Netflix, WordPress, and Reddit will be displaying loading symbols on their front pages to show their support for equal treatment of all the data flowing through the Internet.

  5. 
Past tense & a tense present
The HarperCollins library marketing team was in fine form and fine feathers in Las Vegas at the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference. Among the titles the ladies buzzed was the latest from David ­Nicholls, Us(Harper, Nov. 2014; Prepub Alert, 5/12/14). Biochemist Douglas Petersen faces a crisis when his artist wife Connie, in bed at 4 a.m., tells him that after 24 years of marriage she is thinking of leaving him. The family is about to embark on a Grand Tour of Europe; their 17-year-old son, Albie, is starting college in the fall. An altercation with a guest in their Amsterdam hotel sends Albie off on his own, with the ever reliable Douglas in hot pursuit. I just adored Nicholls’s One Day, though I never got to see the film. His new work is another heart-tugger about love, happiness, family, and learning to let go. Weepy-eyed on the subway seems to be my constant state these days. Thanks, David.
One title presented at the Random House ALA book buzz especially piqued my interest: debut author Allen Eskens’s coming-of-age novel, The Life We Bury (Seventh Street, Oct.). College freshman Joe Talbert is new to the big city, having recently left his hometown and his alcoholic mother’s mania. Sadly, his younger brother, Jeremy, who suffers from autism, is among the jetsam of Joe’s former life. To complete a project for his biography class, Joe heads to the Hillview Manor retirement home, assuming he’ll find a willing interview subject among the elderly residents. What he doesn’t expect is convicted murderer and rapist Carl Iverson, out on parole now that he is dying of pancreatic cancer. Eskens’s first-person narration grabs the reader and never relinquishes its hold. Do things go a bit too easily for our young hero? Perhaps. But the nonstop puzzle solving and unrelenting tension offer a huge payoff.
Then there’s Mary Balogh (rhymes with Kellogg; I asked her). I first became familiar with her work when I fell upon her book Slightly Married, part of her six-volume historical romance “Bedwyn” series. Her new “Survivors’ Club” titles concern six men and one woman damaged (psychologically and physically) during the Peninsular Wars. Years later, they continue to meet annually to reinforce their recovery, move on with their lives, and find romance, of course. Only ­Enchanting, the fourth book in the series (Signet, Nov.), is the story of Flavian Arnott, Viscount Ponsonby, suffering memory loss and a stammer after a head wound and being thrown from his horse. He does remember, though, the woman he met last autumn at a house party, thinking her “enchanting.” Back in the area for the club’s reunion, ­Flavian discovers Mrs. Agnes Keeping is still enchanting and a good deal more. I asked Berkley/NAL associate director of publicity and marketing Erin Galloway about Balogh’s move from Bantam Doubleday Dell (e.g., The Escape, LJ 6/15/14) to NAL’s Signet. “NAL vice president and editorial director Claire Zion is a longtime fan of Mary’s work. NAL originally published Mary in the Signet Regency line, and we’re thrilled to welcome her back with the ‘Survivors’ Club’ series,” Galloway says. My recommendation is to read Balogh, devour Balogh, become addicted to Balogh. You will find yourself in excellent company.
Last, but never least, is the next title in Tessa Dare’s “Castles Ever After” series (after Romancing the Duke, LJ 2/15/14). In Say Yes to the Marquess (Avon, Jan. 2015), Clio Whitmore goes toe-to-toe with her soon-to-be brother-in-law, Rafe Brandon, over her plans to break her engagement to his brother. Determined female vs. a rake and prizefighter; place your bets. And fall in love with librarian Dare.—Bette-Lee Fox



How a bit of romance in your fall reading?

    Past tense & a tense present

    The HarperCollins library marketing team was in fine form and fine feathers in Las Vegas at the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference. Among the titles the ladies buzzed was the latest from David ­Nicholls, Us(Harper, Nov. 2014; Prepub Alert, 5/12/14). Biochemist Douglas Petersen faces a crisis when his artist wife Connie, in bed at 4 a.m., tells him that after 24 years of marriage she is thinking of leaving him. The family is about to embark on a Grand Tour of Europe; their 17-year-old son, Albie, is starting college in the fall. An altercation with a guest in their Amsterdam hotel sends Albie off on his own, with the ever reliable Douglas in hot pursuit. I just adored Nicholls’s One Day, though I never got to see the film. His new work is another heart-tugger about love, happiness, family, and learning to let go. Weepy-eyed on the subway seems to be my constant state these days. Thanks, David.

    One title presented at the Random House ALA book buzz especially piqued my interest: debut author Allen Eskens’s coming-of-age novel, The Life We Bury (Seventh Street, Oct.). College freshman Joe Talbert is new to the big city, having recently left his hometown and his alcoholic mother’s mania. Sadly, his younger brother, Jeremy, who suffers from autism, is among the jetsam of Joe’s former life. To complete a project for his biography class, Joe heads to the Hillview Manor retirement home, assuming he’ll find a willing interview subject among the elderly residents. What he doesn’t expect is convicted murderer and rapist Carl Iverson, out on parole now that he is dying of pancreatic cancer. Eskens’s first-person narration grabs the reader and never relinquishes its hold. Do things go a bit too easily for our young hero? Perhaps. But the nonstop puzzle solving and unrelenting tension offer a huge payoff.

    Then there’s Mary Balogh (rhymes with Kellogg; I asked her). I first became familiar with her work when I fell upon her book Slightly Married, part of her six-volume historical romance “Bedwyn” series. Her new “Survivors’ Club” titles concern six men and one woman damaged (psychologically and physically) during the Peninsular Wars. Years later, they continue to meet annually to reinforce their recovery, move on with their lives, and find romance, of course. Only ­Enchanting, the fourth book in the series (Signet, Nov.), is the story of Flavian Arnott, Viscount Ponsonby, suffering memory loss and a stammer after a head wound and being thrown from his horse. He does remember, though, the woman he met last autumn at a house party, thinking her “enchanting.” Back in the area for the club’s reunion, ­Flavian discovers Mrs. Agnes Keeping is still enchanting and a good deal more. I asked Berkley/NAL associate director of publicity and marketing Erin Galloway about Balogh’s move from Bantam Doubleday Dell (e.g., The Escape, LJ 6/15/14) to NAL’s Signet. “NAL vice president and editorial director Claire Zion is a longtime fan of Mary’s work. NAL originally published Mary in the Signet Regency line, and we’re thrilled to welcome her back with the ‘Survivors’ Club’ series,” Galloway says. My recommendation is to read Balogh, devour Balogh, become addicted to Balogh. You will find yourself in excellent company.

    Last, but never least, is the next title in Tessa Dare’s “Castles Ever After” series (after Romancing the Duke, LJ 2/15/14). In Say Yes to the Marquess (Avon, Jan. 2015), Clio Whitmore goes toe-to-toe with her soon-to-be brother-in-law, Rafe Brandon, over her plans to break her engagement to his brother. Determined female vs. a rake and prizefighter; place your bets. And fall in love with librarian Dare.—Bette-Lee Fox

    How a bit of romance in your fall reading?

  6. Humanity’s end begins at the library.

    They’re baaaack!

    (Source: examiner.com)

  7. A Case for Poirot: On Tackling Agatha Christie’s Most Perfect Creation →

    It’s publication day  for the new Hercule Poirot mystery, which is getting rave reviews, including a star from LJ. Sophie Hannah writes a terrific essay on why she accepted the challenge of resurrecting Agatha Christie’s Belgian sleuth.

  8. thepinakes:

An advertisement for steel library stacks that appeared in the July, 1899 issue of Library Journal.

    thepinakes:

    An advertisement for steel library stacks that appeared in the July, 1899 issue of Library Journal.

  9. 
Icons and illustrations
I have accepted that I will never be invited to one of Vogue magazine’s fashion galas held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the “fashion party of the season”—not even as a grubby journalist or plus-one. But now I have a consolation prize: Vogue & the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute—Parties, Exhibitions, People (Abrams, Sept.) by Vogue International editor at large Hamish Bowles and edited by Chloe Malle, the magazine’s social editor. This beautiful book concentrates on the exhibitions and galas of the 21st century, including the 2005 show Chanel and the blockbuster 2011 exhibition devoted to Alexander McQueen, Savage Beauty. The stories and coverage of the balls and the expositions come from Vogue’s extensive archives and showcase the photographic work of icons Annie Leibovitz and Steven Meisel; the fashion/editorial vision of Vogue editors such as Grace Coddington and Tonne Goodman; a foreword by the director and CEO of the Met, Thomas P. Campbell; and an introduction by Anna Wintour herself. That’s some pretty swell company, and I don’t even have to worry about what to wear!
Another thing I have finally come to terms with is that Nirvana front man Kurt Cobain is really dead—20 years gone, unbelievably. Kurt ­Cobain: The Last Session (Thames & Hudson, Nov.; Prepub Alert, 4/14/14) by photographer Jesse Frohman and others (more about them later) is a lovely homage to the troubled Cobain, who committed suicide in April 1994. The book’s 90 photos—25 in color, some never before published—are from what would turn out to be Cobain’s last professional photo shoot, and they’re accompanied by an interview that “punk historian” Jon Savage (author of Teenage) conducted with ­Cobain for a 1993 article in London’s Observer Magazine as well as additional editorial by Glenn O’Brien, a fashion/music/art chronicler with an impressive pedigree (Interview, Rolling Stone, Oui, High Times, GQ, etc. etc.!).
My only fiction pick this fall is based on a true story: that of songwriter-for-hire Cynthia Weil, who won a ton of Grammys and penned (with her husband and writing partner, Barry Mann) such 1960s hits as “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin,’ ” “We Gotta Get Out of This Place,” and “On Broadway,” to name just a few. I’m Glad I Did (Soho Teen, Jan. 2015) is Weil’s first novel, and if it’s as catchy as even one of her songs, it’s sure to be a No. 1 hit. The publicist’s elevator pitch goes like this: “YA Mad Men with murder, set in the legendary Brill Building.” Did I mention that Weil worked with music producer, songwriter, and convicted murderer Phil Spector? Hmmm.
Also upcoming are two witty and wonderful illustrated works: 101 Two-Letter Words (Norton, Oct.) features singer/songwriter Stephin Merritt’s (of Magnetic Fields) odes to all the two-letter words allowed in the Scrabble and Words with Friends games. Each poem by Merritt is accompanied by an illustration by New Yorker cartoonist extraordinaire Roz Chast. That’s a duo to be reckoned with! Then unsung enablers of greatness, including Andy Warhol’s mom, Dostoyevsky’s wife, and Harper Lee’s patrons, finally get their 15 minutes in The Who, the What, and the When: 65 Artists Illustrate the Secret Sidekicks of History (Chronicle, Nov.).—Liz French

A nice eclectic selection of fall titles from senior editor Liz French.

    Icons and illustrations

    I have accepted that I will never be invited to one of Vogue magazine’s fashion galas held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the “fashion party of the season”—not even as a grubby journalist or plus-one. But now I have a consolation prize: Vogue & the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute—Parties, Exhibitions, People (Abrams, Sept.) by Vogue International editor at large Hamish Bowles and edited by Chloe Malle, the magazine’s social editor. This beautiful book concentrates on the exhibitions and galas of the 21st century, including the 2005 show Chanel and the blockbuster 2011 exhibition devoted to Alexander McQueen, Savage Beauty. The stories and coverage of the balls and the expositions come from Vogue’s extensive archives and showcase the photographic work of icons Annie Leibovitz and Steven Meisel; the fashion/editorial vision of Vogue editors such as Grace Coddington and Tonne Goodman; a foreword by the director and CEO of the Met, Thomas P. Campbell; and an introduction by Anna Wintour herself. That’s some pretty swell company, and I don’t even have to worry about what to wear!

    Another thing I have finally come to terms with is that Nirvana front man Kurt Cobain is really dead—20 years gone, unbelievably. Kurt ­Cobain: The Last Session (Thames & Hudson, Nov.; Prepub Alert, 4/14/14) by photographer Jesse Frohman and others (more about them later) is a lovely homage to the troubled Cobain, who committed suicide in April 1994. The book’s 90 photos—25 in color, some never before published—are from what would turn out to be Cobain’s last professional photo shoot, and they’re accompanied by an interview that “punk historian” Jon Savage (author of Teenage) conducted with ­Cobain for a 1993 article in London’s Observer Magazine as well as additional editorial by Glenn O’Brien, a fashion/music/art chronicler with an impressive pedigree (Interview, Rolling Stone, Oui, High Times, GQ, etc. etc.!).

    My only fiction pick this fall is based on a true story: that of songwriter-for-hire Cynthia Weil, who won a ton of Grammys and penned (with her husband and writing partner, Barry Mann) such 1960s hits as “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin,’ ” “We Gotta Get Out of This Place,” and “On Broadway,” to name just a few. I’m Glad I Did (Soho Teen, Jan. 2015) is Weil’s first novel, and if it’s as catchy as even one of her songs, it’s sure to be a No. 1 hit. The publicist’s elevator pitch goes like this: “YA Mad Men with murder, set in the legendary Brill Building.” Did I mention that Weil worked with music producer, songwriter, and convicted murderer Phil Spector? Hmmm.

    Also upcoming are two witty and wonderful illustrated works: 101 Two-Letter Words (Norton, Oct.) features singer/songwriter Stephin Merritt’s (of Magnetic Fields) odes to all the two-letter words allowed in the Scrabble and Words with Friends games. Each poem by Merritt is accompanied by an illustration by New Yorker cartoonist extraordinaire Roz Chast. That’s a duo to be reckoned with! Then unsung enablers of greatness, including Andy Warhol’s mom, Dostoyevsky’s wife, and Harper Lee’s patrons, finally get their 15 minutes in The Who, the What, and the When: 65 Artists Illustrate the Secret Sidekicks of History (Chronicle, Nov.).—Liz French

    A nice eclectic selection of fall titles from senior editor Liz French.

  10. New York Public Library awards restaurant entrepreneurs $15,000 for LES eatery - am New York →

    nypl:

    You can begin your entrepreneurial dreams too! The 2015 competition begins next month. Attend one of the orientation sessions held at branches in the Bronx, Manhattan and Staten Island and you’ll be well on your way to being NYC’s next class of entrepreneurs.

  11. willywaldo:

onceread:

libralthinking:

niwandajones:

Love it.
(Source.)

Derrangement and Description. Rebecca’s creations always make me LOL and then weep just a bit at the implications. 

I’m taking this to Midwinter.

Library Bingo!

    willywaldo:

    onceread:

    libralthinking:

    niwandajones:

    Love it.

    (Source.)

    Derrangement and Description. Rebecca’s creations always make me LOL and then weep just a bit at the implications. 

    I’m taking this to Midwinter.

    Library Bingo!

  12. Original comic by John Kleckner, modified by an anonymous librarian.

    Original comic by John Kleckner, modified by an anonymous librarian.

    (Source: pinterest.com)

  13. Make it a Maker Monday at your library with these great ideas from the folks at http://makeitatyourlibrary.org/. How about a bouncy kids’ camera?

    P.S. Here are the step-by-step instructions

    (Source: youtube.com)

  14. money-in-veins:

Literacy, a right for all! Happy Literacy Day!

    money-in-veins:

    Literacy, a right for all! Happy Literacy Day!

  15. mylifeinthelibrary:

All of my holds came in at the same time, as per usual.

    mylifeinthelibrary:

    All of my holds came in at the same time, as per usual.