Library Journal

Sep 01

smithsonianlibraries:

May your Labor Day be full of right-thinking and celebration!
We found this on our online exhibition, Doodles, Drafts, and Designs: Industrial Drawings from the Smithsonian. 

smithsonianlibraries:

May your Labor Day be full of right-thinking and celebration!

We found this on our online exhibition, Doodles, Drafts, and Designs: Industrial Drawings from the Smithsonian

(via willywaldo)

aotus:

Happy Labor Day!
"A truly American sentiment recognizes the dignity of labor and the fact that honor lies in honest toil." -Grover Cleveland
Image: Public Law 53-95: An Act Making Labor Day a Legal Holiday, June 28, 1894. General Records of the U.S. Government, National Archives and Records Administration
Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

aotus:

Happy Labor Day!

"A truly American sentiment recognizes the dignity of labor and the fact that honor lies in honest toil." -Grover Cleveland

Image: Public Law 53-95: An Act Making Labor Day a Legal Holiday, June 28, 1894. General Records of the U.S. Government, National Archives and Records Administration

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

(via todaysdocument)

willywaldo:

So Jonathan Lethem’s classic novel about 1970s Brooklyn is now a musical.

Looking forward to seeing this!

willywaldo:

So Jonathan Lethem’s classic novel about 1970s Brooklyn is now a musical.

Looking forward to seeing this!

[video]

Aug 31

“Librarians’ values are as sound as Girl Scouts’: truth, free speech, and universal literacy. And, like Scouts, they possess a quality that I think makes librarians invaluable and indispensable: they want to help. They want to help us. They want to be of service. And they’re not trying to sell us anything.” — Marilyn Johnson- This Book is Overdue: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All (via marissathelibrarian)

(via thehannahmachine)

Current Openings -

One of my reviewers is looking for a dynamic candidate to fill this position. I promised I would spread the word  Sounds like a great job in a beautiful part of the country. Tumblarians, you have until September 19 to apply.

Act now! This kind of position does not open often! It’s an opportunity to live in a place surrounded by natural beauty, with recreation opportunities at Mt. Baker, on our many lakes and rivers and in Bellingham Bay and beyond.

This is the perfect-sized library system for someone who likes to jump right in and get things done; there are lots of opportunities for creativity!

News Challenge to explore role of libraries in the digital age -

[video]

Aug 29

pleatedjeans:

huge cartoons

Your Friday funny! Have a great Labor Day holiday weekend.

pleatedjeans:

huge cartoons

Your Friday funny! Have a great Labor Day holiday weekend.

(via padnick)


As I prepped to write this, I realized that many of the upcoming titles I’m excited about involve communication—be it interviews or letters or examinations of how we interact—and crafts. Here are some I find particularly interesting.
“I had to put down By the Book: Writers on Literature and the Literary Life from The New York Times Book Review (Holt, Oct.),” edited by Pamela Paul, “to do real work,” I wrote to one of LJ’s literature reviewers. She helpfully agreed to review the book. The astute unabridged interviews feature a wide range of nonfiction and fiction writers such as Dan Savage, Neil Gaiman, and J.K. Rowling.
Another upcoming interview collection worth noting is Daniel Rachel’s The Art of Noise: Conversations with Great Songwriters (Griffin: St. Martin’s, Oct.). Originally published in the UK, it’s a thick volume that boasts new and in-depth interviews with 27 British songwriters whose popularity spans decades—everyone from Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe (Pet Shop Boys) to Noel Gallagher (Oasis) and Lily Allen talk about their craft. Read it cover to cover or skip around to your favorite artists.
As for books on how we interact, one that seems to blend social science with pop culture and memoir is Nev Schulman’s In Real Life: Love, Lies & Identity in the Digital Age (Grand Central, Sept.; Prepub Alert, 3/17/14). Schulman hosts MTV’s Catfish: The TV Show, which investigates whether people are in online relationships with someone legitimate or a “catfish,” defined by Merriam-Webster as “a person who sets up a false personal profile on a social networking site for fraudulent or deceptive purposes.” Here he provides insights into the show and people’s motivations for catfishing.
I’m also starting to think about fall crafting projects. One book on my radar is Vintage Knit: 25 Knitting & Crochet Patterns Refashioned for Today (Laurence King, Sept.) by Marine Malak with Geraldine Warner. It’s well organized and offers large photos, including one of the original piece that inspired each pattern; also helpful is that instructions for color-work are both written out and charted. I can’t wait to try out the Two-Colour Spot Jersey. But, should this go awry, as I unravel my project and cast-on again I’ll keep close at hand a copy of Heather Mann’s CraftFail: When Homemade Goes Horribly Wrong (Workman, Oct.). Based on the blog of the same name, it makes light of disastrous crafting escapades. “They come out squashed and torn and look like something one might use to scrub feet,” laments the caption of a tissue paper flower. Try, try again.—Amanda Mastrull

Hard to believe summer is almost over. As consolation, the fall publishing promises a cornucopia of great titles as selected by LJ’s ever-discerning book review editors. 

As I prepped to write this, I realized that many of the upcoming titles I’m excited about involve communication—be it interviews or letters or examinations of how we interact—and crafts. Here are some I find particularly interesting.

“I had to put down By the Book: Writers on Literature and the Literary Life from The New York Times Book Review (Holt, Oct.),” edited by Pamela Paul, “to do real work,” I wrote to one of LJ’s literature reviewers. She helpfully agreed to review the book. The astute unabridged interviews feature a wide range of nonfiction and fiction writers such as Dan Savage, Neil Gaiman, and J.K. Rowling.

Another upcoming interview collection worth noting is Daniel Rachel’s The Art of Noise: Conversations with Great Songwriters (Griffin: St. Martin’s, Oct.). Originally published in the UK, it’s a thick volume that boasts new and in-depth interviews with 27 British songwriters whose popularity spans decades—everyone from Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe (Pet Shop Boys) to Noel Gallagher (Oasis) and Lily Allen talk about their craft. Read it cover to cover or skip around to your favorite artists.

As for books on how we interact, one that seems to blend social science with pop culture and memoir is Nev Schulman’s In Real Life: Love, Lies & Identity in the Digital Age (Grand Central, Sept.; Prepub Alert, 3/17/14). Schulman hosts MTV’s Catfish: The TV Show, which investigates whether people are in online relationships with someone legitimate or a “catfish,” defined by Merriam-Webster as “a person who sets up a false personal profile on a social networking site for fraudulent or deceptive purposes.” Here he provides insights into the show and people’s motivations for catfishing.

I’m also starting to think about fall crafting projects. One book on my radar is Vintage Knit: 25 Knitting & Crochet Patterns Refashioned for Today (Laurence King, Sept.) by Marine Malak with Geraldine Warner. It’s well organized and offers large photos, including one of the original piece that inspired each pattern; also helpful is that instructions for color-work are both written out and charted. I can’t wait to try out the Two-Colour Spot Jersey. But, should this go awry, as I unravel my project and cast-on again I’ll keep close at hand a copy of Heather Mann’s CraftFail: When Homemade Goes Horribly Wrong (Workman, Oct.). Based on the blog of the same name, it makes light of disastrous crafting escapades. “They come out squashed and torn and look like something one might use to scrub feet,” laments the caption of a tissue paper flower. Try, try again.—Amanda Mastrull

Hard to believe summer is almost over. As consolation, the fall publishing promises a cornucopia of great titles as selected by LJ’s ever-discerning book review editors. 

(Source: reviews.libraryjournal.com)

Your Friday fashion statement. Just the thing for a long holiday weekend.

Your Friday fashion statement. Just the thing for a long holiday weekend.

(Source: etsy.com)

Aug 28

If you build it, they will come!

If you build it, they will come!

(Source: americanlibraryassoc, via lubetzky)

[video]

[video]

The Audiobookmobile hits the road! -

The Audio Publishers Association (APA) has created a custom-wrapped “Audiobookmobile” that will travel to book festivals and libraries in five cities from August 30 to September 27, 2014, giving away prizes and downloads with the aim of introducing the audio format to new listeners.

Keep an ear out for this bookmobile!