Library Journal

Sep 30

[video]

newyorker:

Read about Christoph Niemann’s animated, rainy-day cover this week.

Cool! The magazine’s first animated cover. Perfect for a rainy Tuesday. 

“When I arrived in New York for the first time, it was pouring,” the German artist Christoph Niemann says. “Maybe that’s why, to my mind, there’s no place on earth where being stuck in traffic on a rainy day is more beautiful.”

newyorker:

Read about Christoph Niemann’s animated, rainy-day cover this week.

Cool! The magazine’s first animated cover. Perfect for a rainy Tuesday.

“When I arrived in New York for the first time, it was pouring,” the German artist Christoph Niemann says. “Maybe that’s why, to my mind, there’s no place on earth where being stuck in traffic on a rainy day is more beautiful.”

(Source: newyorker.com)

Sep 29

[video]

The Comeback Kids | Library by Design -

Give a big welcome back to these newly rebuilt and restored libraries.

akashicbooks:


Albertine Books in French and English, a project of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy, opened over the weekend in New York City. Albertine announced the development with a Facebook post flourish on Friday: “Et voilà! After years in the making, Albertine Books in French and English opens its doors! We can’t wait to share the new space with you. Come visit us tomorrow, 9/27.”

(via Shelf Awareness for Monday, September 29, 2014 | Shelf Awareness)
Welcome, Albertine Books! And many thanks to the Cultural Services of the French Embassy for their continued support of our Haiti Noir anthologies, both edited by Edwidge Danticat.

akashicbooks:

Albertine Books in French and English, a project of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy, opened over the weekend in New York City. Albertine announced the development with a Facebook post flourish on Friday: “Et voilà! After years in the making, Albertine Books in French and English opens its doors! We can’t wait to share the new space with you. Come visit us tomorrow, 9/27.”

(via Shelf Awareness for Monday, September 29, 2014 | Shelf Awareness)

Welcome, Albertine Books! And many thanks to the Cultural Services of the French Embassy for their continued support of our Haiti Noir anthologies, both edited by Edwidge Danticat.

joehillsthrills:

A lovely review of HORNS. I’m aglow.

joehillsthrills:

A lovely review of HORNS. I’m aglow.

TDS14: Libraries @ the Center | Program - The Digital Shift -

Join us on October 1st for The Digital Shift: Libraries @ The Center, a dynamic day-long online conversation about our shared digital future. 

It’s not too late to register for this great lineup of speakers and topics, including:

Who’s Afraid of the Internet? Digital Literacy, Corporate Data-Mining, and Government Surveillance

AcademicAcademicAcademic

This session will discuss the challenges of promoting digital adoption and digital literacy in the post-Snowden era of widespread reports of government and corporate surveillance of internet traffic. It will discuss teaching techniques to distinguish well-founded skepticism from unfounded skepticism and helping digital learners do a cost benefit analysis in a learning environment based on respect and consent. The session hopes to touch on interpreting concepts like “free”, “open”, “private”, “commercial”, and “non-commercial” in their digital context, and conclude with some practical resources for increasing online privacy (DuckDuckGo, Disconnect.me, and others)

Presenter:
Scott Pinkelman
, Digital Literacy Innovation Specialist at the Free Library of Philadelphia (PA)

Implementing New Digital Strategies in Response to a Community Emergency: The Queens Library Post Super-storm Sandy

AcademicAcademic

In October of 2012, Super-storm Sandy devastated the Rockaways. Queens Library stepped up to provide critical crisis information services in the weeks that followed. Among the most requested service was access to online information as thousands of Queens residents lost both connectivity as well as their digital technology in the storm’s aftermath.  When Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Google combined to donate 5,000 Google Tablets to Queens Library for use in those affected areas, the library stepped up. But how to respond when broadband access was scarce or not available? QPL used this lack of Wi-Fi access as a design inspiration and a springboard for innovation. QPL built a tablet platform loaded with Queens Library content– useful with or without Wi-Fi. Today library customers in and beyond Queens’s storm affected areas have access to curated, practical resources with a special focus on resources that aid their economic viability.  Lessons learned from this work should spark new thinking about the central role of public libraries in community informatics and disaster assistance and recovery. This presentation will outline how Queens Library developed a proprietary interface platform preloaded with specific community resources and customized content to assist  the community in finding information about disaster relief, housing, jobs, education, community health, and immigration information. Queens Library received the 2014 ALA Library of the Future

Presenter:
Kelvin Watson
, VP Digital Strategy and Services, Queens Library (NY)

Sep 27

[video]

[video]

Sep 26

(Source: stampaday, via bookpatrol)

[video]

Sep 24

Special Edition: Report from the 2014 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Awards | What We’re Reading -

My colleague Liz French rounded up a nicely eclectic list from the likes of novelist Madison Smartt Bell (his pick: Chantel Acevedo’s novel The Distant Marvels) to award-winning nonfiction writer Adrian Nicole Leblanc (her pick: Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist).

As the photographer notes, “a skullless situation at Norlin” library on the campus of the University of Colorado, Sept. 2013.
Gaurav Vaidya Flickr - Creative Commons

As the photographer notes, “a skullless situation at Norlin” library on the campus of the University of Colorado, Sept. 2013.

Gaurav Vaidya Flickr - Creative Commons

(Source: kunc.org)

What we’re all really saying during Banned Books Week

randomhouse:

image

(via quirkbooks)

Sep 23

“We use this little card so much that it went from being being waaaaaay down in the bottom of my wallet to, like, right after my license and debit card.” — a regular dad, handing over his library card to put his son’s favorite Steve Jenkins book on hold. (via tales-from-the-childrens-room)