1. A PATRON ADMITS THEIR REFERENCE QUESTION MAY BE DIFFICULT

    librarianproblems:

    image

  2. Science fiction takes over London as Worldcon and Nine Worlds land →

    Another reason to go to London! (As if you really need an excuse.)

  3. byleistrs:

    Now this is what I call a very special Library Journal moment!

    (Source: starlorrd)

  4. willywaldo:

Thank God for Samuel L. Jackson teaching us the proper pronunciation of “library.”

    willywaldo:

    Thank God for Samuel L. Jackson teaching us the proper pronunciation of “library.”

  5. chuckpalahniuk:

Huge news today! Dark Horse Comics will publish the sequel to FIGHT CLUB as a 10 part maxiseries, debuting in April 2015. Read all the details here:
http://chuckpalahniuk.net/news/dark-horse-comics-to-publish-10-issue-series-of-fight-club-2

“Welcome to Fight Club. The first rule of Fight Club is: you do not talk about Fight Club. The second rule of Fight Club is: you DO NOT talk about Fight Club!”

    chuckpalahniuk:

    Huge news today! Dark Horse Comics will publish the sequel to FIGHT CLUB as a 10 part maxiseries, debuting in April 2015. Read all the details here:

    http://chuckpalahniuk.net/news/dark-horse-comics-to-publish-10-issue-series-of-fight-club-2

    “Welcome to Fight Club. The first rule of Fight Club is: you do not talk about Fight Club. The second rule of Fight Club is: you DO NOT talk about Fight Club!”

  6. Moving day at 160 Varick Street. Library Journal bids farewell to Soho and spectacular sunsets as we head down to the Financial District. As of Monday, July 21, our new address is 123 William Street., Suite 802, New York, NY 10038.

  7. deystreetbooks:

We’re thrilled to finally reveal the cover and title of Amy Poehler’s forthcoming book - Yes Please is on sale 10/28/14.
Pre-order your copy now: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | iBookstore | Indiebound | Books-a-Million
Watch the cover reveal on Today!

Have you ordered your copies yet?

    deystreetbooks:

    We’re thrilled to finally reveal the cover and title of Amy Poehler’s forthcoming book - Yes Please is on sale 10/28/14.

    Pre-order your copy now: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | iBookstore | Indiebound | Books-a-Million

    Watch the cover reveal on Today!

    Have you ordered your copies yet?

  8. Librarian mohawks – makes you do a double take, right? Those are two words that usually do NOT go together.

    But thanks to Vista, now they do, as five good-natured librarians made good on their promise this spring and got mohawks because the community pushed them to a big milestone – Vista was the first county library to make it over the 1-million check-out mark.

    That means the community checked out more than 1 million books, DVD’s and CDs over the course of the fiscal year, which ended June 30.

    Do you dare to take the librarian mohawk challenge?

    (Source: timesofsandiego.com)

  9. pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

Happy Publication Day!

    pbsthisdayinhistory:

    July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

    On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

    Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

    Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

    Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

    Happy Publication Day!

  10. vintageanchorbooks:

    "Word Crimes" is better than "Blurred Lines". 

    "Your participles are dangling!"

  11. Scenes from Last Night

    Scenes from Last Night

    Rainbow Rowell: Is that... a pajama cardigan?
    Me: I mean, yeah. I've tweeted about them before.
    Rainbow: I guess I knew it was something you DID. I just didn't realize you even TRAVELED with one.
    Me: Oh yeah. For layering on over-air conditioned buses and things.
    Rainbow: So it's a TRAVELING pajama cardigan.
    Me: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pajama Cardigans is just another name for the ALA.

  12. The biggest issue with equating the library with a Netflix for books is that it sends a false message that libraries are worth little more than $8 or $12 or $20 a month. That the services offered in libraries are little more than options to which people can subscribe, rather than actual services anyone can utilize at any time.

    When the library is made to be seen as a business, rather than the heart of a community or a fundamental service made possible through citizen-approved tax dollars, it makes the library expendable. That expendability then moves down the chain: staff salaries get cut, then staff withers, then more programs and projects that benefit the community — books and movies and CDs and magazines and newspapers and wifi and computer access and database subscriptions and programs for all shapes, colors, and sizes of people — disappear, too. It detracts from the unique aspects that make a library what it is: a place for all, rather than a place for some.

    Libraries reach out where Netflix reaches in.

    — from Libraries Are Not a “Netflix” for Books.  (via catagator)

  13. harperperennial:

    bbcamerica is adapting Bernard Cornwell’s Saxon Tales into a TV series!

    Can’t wait to watch this!

  14. Summer Best Debuts | First Novels →

  15. bookavore:

    libraryreads:

    Hot off the press, the Library Reads August 2014 list! 

    We’ve got the first in a new series from library fav Chelsea Cain. Lev Grossman wraps up the adventures of Magician’s trilogy. A BEA Buzz book: The Miniaturist

    New books from staff and patron favorites Amy Bloom, Liane Moriarty, John Scalzi, and Thirty Umrigar. Everyone’s favorite mother and son writing team bring us latest historical mystery in An Unwilling Accomplice

    And a little something, something for the romance readers from Susan Elizabeth Phillips and Katie MacAlister.  

    Happy reading!

    I keep meaning to blog about The Magician’s Land, so I will take this opportunity to say that I loved it—very satisfying ending to the trilogy—but I really wish I had re-read the first two before diving into it. So if you’re waiting for it, take this opportunity to re-read The Magicians and The Magician King to immerse yourself properly.

    I remain impressed by what Grossman managed to do with these books: be utterly skeptical about magic and its importance while maintaining a childlike adoration of it. I always get such a rush reading these books, because the combination allows me to re-visit my first experiences of Philip Pullman, Susan Cooper, Garth Nix, et al., in a way that most other fantasy books do not. That headlong and greedy reading experience, those books that are so good you forget to change positions and your arm falls asleep—I always feel that Grossman misses it as much as I do, and it’s a treat to read a book that reflects being that affected by fantasy writing, and even manages the same trick a few times.